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Boutis and Butterflies in a Tri-Fold Pouch

Little pouches come in handy for a number purposes. They can provide a protective sleeve for cell phones, mini tablets, cameras, etc. Or, by adding a looped cord to use as a handle, it can serve as a small evening bag to accommodate essentials. When I spend a lot of time making something, it's nice if there's a practical purpose to the item.

This is the second tri-fold butterfly pouch that I have made. It is a little larger than the first, and the design has evolved somewhat.

The 2nd, newer version of the butterfly pouch.

The original butterfly pouch; smaller with different motifs.

The latest pouch is lined with a grey cotton and assembled in the same way as I did the first. See the first pouch here.

Open front.


Back and front flap.

This close-up of the butterfly highlights the background filler stitch. The stitch, called "point rapproche" (meaning back and forth stitch), has a similar effect as the basic stipple stitch in machine quilting.


Enough pouches for now.
Time to focus on Christmas ornaments.

Comments

  1. Think about yukata cotton as a lining fabric for pouch No. 3! Your work is spectacular!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Patricia. I am already planning a future project with a Japanese influenced design that will incorporate the yukata. I'll keep you posted.

      Delete
  2. This is just lovely, once again! Beautiful design, beautifully made. Great finish!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Monica. I'm done with pouches for a bit; time to move on to something else.

      Delete

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