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Free Motion Quilting: Placemats

Sanglier, Palm Trees and Sunshine

9 Piggies Dancing! I used free motion embroidery for the sangliers with "Magnifico", a 40 wt. polyester thread from Superior Threads.

Sangliers are wild boars that still run freely in large numbers throughout the French countryside. Symbolizing strength and invincibility, it's image has been immortalized in various art forms through the ages.

Sanglier en bronze

A number of years ago, I was asked to quilt a tablecloth where the sanglier motif was the focal point. The owner of this tablecloth has now requested placemats designed around the same theme. This time, the design should include sangliers and palm trees on warm terracotta coloured fabric. To this, I added a vineyard (what's more French than a vineyard?) where the sanglier might find himself very comfortable.

Below, my new design is tucked into the fabrics that I am using for these placemats. The main fabric (on the bottom) is one of Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry's "Gradations" from Benartex. It was the perfect find for this project. (And, I found it in my stash; even better). The backing (the patterned fabric) and binding fabric are a good match with the "Gradations".


Below are a few options for the layout. The pattern could be centered horizontally with the copper in the center.

The fabric is "Gradations" by Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry for Benartex.

Or the shade could change from the darker red to the warmer copper.


In the end, we chose an option with the copper running vertically down the center. (below).

The little piggie was machine embroidered separately, then appliqued onto the main fabric with a 40 wt. embroidery thread from Superior. Using the same heavier embroidery thread, I have quilted around the sanglier and palm tree. The rest of the quilting, the grape vines and background, will be done with a lighter thread that blends into the fabric as much as possible. More on the thread next time.

Sandwiched and pin basted, the placemats are ready for quilting.




Comments

  1. I think it was your first sanglier design, shared at TQS, that led me to find your blog! I don't know anyone else who does work like this. They will be gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's kinda cool. I didn't even remember that I had posted blogs at TQS, but now that you remind me, I remember. I'm glad we met there.

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