Skip to main content

Break for Boutis


You may recall my post on July 31, 2014, (which I just republished because I somehow returned it to draft mode?!?), in which I showed a few of the boutis projects that I am currently working on. In that post I show one rose window, completed in white batiste, which will become a wall hanging, (stay tuned!), and another rose window that I had just started in the saffron batitse.

Progress in July.

This saffron boutis rose window will become a pin cushion and be partnered with the "cigale" needle fold shown in the post from August 12th.

In this little project, the two basic stitches that I have used  are the back-stitch and the running stitch, as well as variations to the pattern of each stitch. The back-stitch completes the tiny round petals in the center of the design. It is also used in the background, where a variation of the design creates the "point de vauvert" stitch. Everything else is stitched in just a plain running stitch.

In the photo directly below, using a variation to the pattern, the running stitch acts as a filler stitch inside each of the petals. Called "point rapproche", (which means to bring closer together/to create a connection), it is used the way we use a stipple stitch in free motion quilting. I have seen this stitch filling in the entire background of a lap quilt. Now that's a lot of tiny, little stitches!!!

"Point rapproche", filling the inside of the petals with tiny, closely spaced running stitches.

"Point de vauvert", shown in the background pattern below, is a series of short lines, each line made with 3-5 back stitches, and each row off-set from the previous row. When filled with the cording, it makes for an interesting background to frame the central design.

Here the stitching is completed.

The back of the completed work is shown below.

In a perfectly executed piece of, boutis, the back should be stitched as well as the front. It should be completely reversible. Hmm.....!  Let's just say that this one will make a nice pin cushion, with only the top visible.

Cording is the last step in the procedure and is always done from the back, only when all of the stitching is completed.

The cording process has begun.

This little project is currently almost completed and just waiting for the finishing touches. Coming soon.


I will link this post up to the WIP Wednesdays on the Needle and Thread Network.

Comments

  1. Am anxious to see them finished! Such tiny stitches.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Karen. I'm hoping to finish the little pincushion soon.

      Delete
  2. I'm trying to imagine the time and artistry that would have to go into making a quilt entirely quolted with those beautiful, tiny stitches. Amazing!

    I'm looking forward to seeing the finished piece!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some of the boutis quilts that I saw in France were so perfectly stitched, that I had to examine them very closely before I believed that it could have been done by hand. Many very talented, (and patient) stitchers in France!

      Delete
  3. I see you are using yellow cording! Would white show through the front?

    This is such a pretty pattern, and perfect for a pin cushion. Can't wait to see it finished!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure if white cording would make a big difference, but because this yellow cotton yarn was something that I had in my stash from a long time ago, I thought I would give it a try. I'm glad that I did for two reasons: first, yellow on yellow gives it a richer colour. And second, I am looking for alternatives to some of the French products, which are not consistently available on-line. This particular yarn was a very good alternative.

      I'm also hoping to see it finished soon!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Whole Cloth Quilt Silk: Finished

"Dancing Shamrocks" , as I have named her, is finally finished and on the bed. My hope had been to finish the quilt for our 40th wedding Anniversary, which was March 17th. 2019! It was in May of 2018 that I was ready to start the machine quilting. By November of that year, the top of the quilt was finished with only the border left to quilt. A 2019 finish seemed quite possible. Unfortunately, unforeseen circumstances put the project on hold from Dec.2018 until October 2019. However, from then until it's finish in April of this year, my sewing machine and I have been best of buds. Even so, we didn't quite make it for March 17th of this year, our 41st, but came close. The last stitch closing the binding went in on April 24, 2020. When squaring up so large quilt (94" x 100"), a clean floor is my only option and the parquet flooring gives me great reference points for getting it square. Unfortunately, when I laid it out, setting up for advantag

Blocking and Squaring Boutis

The door of her cage has been opened. She is free to fly off and find her destiny. After many months of hand stitching and then many more months of cording, my little "colibri" is ready to set off on her own. As this was my first attempt at designing so large a boutis piece, it has been a bit of a learning curve. All of the tight swirls, curls and circles are a great deal more difficult and time consuming to cord then are the longer more gentle channels. Maintaining an even tension is absolutely necessary throughout the process, so patience comes in very handy when doing the cording. Once all of the stitching and cording is complete, the boutis must be washed and squared up. After it is soaked overnight in a basin of water with a mild detergent, it gets rinsed gently in several clear washes, then rolled in a towel to remove the excess water.  If some of the pencil lines have not disappeared after the inital soaking, it can be soaked again, as often as is necessary

Whole Cloth Silk Quilt: Quilting Progress

Stitch by Stitch and Line by Line When I started the first rough sketches for a quilt for our bed back in 2013, I had no idea it would take this long to finally get the quilt to the quilting stage. As the ideas came and went, and we came and went to and from France every six months, the designs got altered, rejected, put on hold and restarted many times. Staying at home for the last few years, progress was actually possible. Thanks to Autocad and my husband's input, the design finally came together early this year.  Whew! The quilt is now well on it's way, with a hoped for finish before 2019. (Fingers crossed!) Most of the outline got quilted before the chalk lines disappeared. All major design lines are outlined with 1/2" channels. Using a quilting ruler (in this case Kelly Cline's straight edge ruler ) is very helpful for accuracy. I love these rulers and am getting pretty comfortable with the ones used for stitching straight lines. On my next p